Mineral Resources and the Right to Say NO

We all have the right to say no.

The education we receive, and democracy give us the right to say no, but it also teaches us the duty to respect those who say yes. The exercise of citizenship stems from the responsibility with which we love rights and duties, pondering the arguments of all parties. It is from this exercise that emerge solutions of common interest.

Read the article in the attached PDF file.

The original Portuguese version.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Euromines.

 

Contribution to Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation

Climate change is perhaps the most important issue facing our world today. Its consequences could be catastrophic to all the people, animals and plants that live on this Earth. As a foundational sector that affects many other industries and activities through the raw materials produced, there are a variety of ways the European mineral raw materials industry helps fight climate change. These contributions fall into two main categories: providing materials for sustainable efforts and continuously improving processes within the mineral raw materials sector.

Minerals and Metals Enabling Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a total of 17 global sustainable development goals that were adopted by the United Nations (UN) in September 2015 and came into force in January 2016. Ecological, economic and social challenges such as climate change, inequality and poverty are to be solved by 2030 by means of this strategy. Here’s how the European mineral raw materials industry is contributing to these goals.

Euromines Position on EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030

Euromines supports the preparation of EU nature restoration targets in 2021. The different policies like the Biodiversity Strategy 2030 and the Zero Pollution Action Plan, but also other related policies like the Industrial Strategy and the list of Critical Raw Materials, must be coherent. A proactive dialog between our sector and EU decision makers is key to let our sector interact as source for EU businesses within the unique EU framework of nature protection. The European mineral raw materials industry can contribute with its best practices of biodiversity conservation.

Due to its long mining history, Europe has developed unique competence in rehabilitation and eco-system management and the European mining sector actively supports the conservation of biodiversity.

Mining with Nature - The Swedish mining and minerals industry’s road map for biodiversity net gain

The road map for increased biodiversity has been produced within a project financed by the strategic innovation programme Swedish Mining Innovation, a joint venture by Vinnova, Formas and the Swedish Energy Agency. The strategic work has been jointly financed by Boliden, LKAB and Svemin.
The project has been led by Ecogain in close cooperation with Svemin’s Nature Working Group. This working group includes representatives from Boliden, LKAB, Nordkalk, Zinkgruvan and Cementa.
The steering committee has been made up of representatives from Svemin, LKAB, Boliden and Swedish Mining Innovation.
The project has run during the period December 2019 ‚Äď December 2020. This road map is a first step towards the Swedish mining and minerals industry's 2030 target for biodiversity.

Read more on Svemin website.

Top-down characterization of resource use in LCA

from problem definition of resource use to operational characterization factors for dissipation of elements to the environment

Authors:
Lauran van Oers, Jeroen B. Guinée, Reinout Heijungs, Rita Schulze, Rodrigo A. F. Alvarenga, Jo Dewulf, Johannes Drielsma, David Sanjuan-Delmás, Tobias C. Kampmann, Glenn Bark, Ainara Garcia Uriarte, Pierre Menger, Mats Lindblom, Lucas Alcon, Manuel Sevilla Ramos, Juan Manuel Escobar Torres
The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment,

Published: 11 September 2020

Purpose
The methods for assessing the impact of using abiotic resources in life cycle assessment (LCA) have always been heavily debated. One of the main reasons for this is the lack of a common understanding of the problem related to resource use. This article reports the results of an effort to reach such common understanding between different stakeholder groups and the LCA community. For this, a top-down approach was applied.

 

Euromines feedback to Legislative proposal on substantiating green claims using PEF

Euromines has made significant contributions to the science of Life Cycle Assessment, on which the Environmental Footprint methods are based (click here¬†for a full list of peer-reviewed publications). Since 2013, Euromines has been actively engaged in the European Commission‚Äôs Environmental Footprint (EF) and has helped develop, during the EF Pilot Phase, the ‚ÄėProduct Environmental Footprint Category Rules (PEFCR) for Metal Sheets in Various Applications‚Äô. Through our involvement in the EF Pilot Phase, the PEF Guidelines have been improved, but not all the defined shortcomings have been resolved to ensure that the methodology is sufficiently robust for use in EU policy, and does not lead to inappropriate results. In particular, the need to develop a better method of assessing the impacts of Resource Use in the years to come has been formally expressed and the European Commission has committed to invest jointly with the industry in the development of an alternative approach to better quantify the potential for conservation of resources.

Read the full version of the Euromines feedback to Legislative proposal on substantiating green claims using PEF.

Euromines Annual Report 2019

The Euromines Annual Report 2019 is now available! This year, we present what Euromines is doing to secure supply chains in a rapidly changing world. The European mineral raw materials sector supports a wide variety of industries through the supply of raw materials, and in this role as well as within the mining sector itself, we must prioritise both sustainable efforts and competitiveness.

As Euromines President Mark Rachovides states in the Foreword:

‚ÄúToday‚Äôs decision makers‚Äô contexts, terms of reference, priorities and language have changed. They want and fear different things that reflect a new consensus, whether we like that or not, and that is an opportunity, not a threat.‚ÄĚ

As always, we are certain in the ability of Euromines and our members to rise to the occasion and find solutions to today’s challenges.

Abiotic resource use in life cycle impact assessment‚ÄĒPart I- towards a common perspective

At the beginning of the SUPRIM project, there was no global consensus on the assessment of impacts from the use of abiotic resources (minerals and metals), in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA). Unlike with other impact categories such as global warming, there is not just one single, explicitly agreed-upon problem arising from the use of abiotic resources. The topic is complex and new methods are still being developed, all with different perspectives and views on resource use. For this reason, the SUPRIM project initiated a consensus process together with members from the research and mining communities, with the aim to obtain an understanding of different stakeholders’ views and concerns regarding potential issues resulting from the use of resources. This paper reports on this consensus process and its outcomes. Insights from this process are twofold: First, the outcome of the process is a clear definition of the perspectives on abiotic resources which form the starting point to further refine or develop LCIA methods on abiotic resource use. Second, the process itself has been a challenging but valuable exercise, which can inspire the evolution of other complex issues in life cycle impact assessment, where research communities face similar issues as experienced with abiotic resources (e.g. water and land use, social LCA, etc.).

Abiotic resource use in life cycle impact assessment‚ÄĒPart II ‚Äď Linking perspectives and modelling concepts

Starting from a lack of consensus on how to consistently assess abiotic resource use in life cycle assessment, a  structured approach was developed to enable a classification of perspectives on resource use, based on the socalled role of resources. Using this classification, this paper focusses on analysing links between perspectives and modelling concepts, i.e. the conceptual implementation. To analyse the modelling concepts for a selection of existing LCIA methods and other modelling approaches, the concept of the system model is introduced. It defines the relevant inventory flows to be assessed by the LCIA method, and, at the same time, to be considered in the characterization model, and how the flows and stocks of resources used to calculate the characterization factors are positioned in relation to environment (nature) and economy (technosphere). For consistency, they should be aligned with the position of inventory flows and, at the same time, reflect the perspective on resources taken by the method. Using this concept, we critically review a selection of methods and other modelling approaches for consistency with the perspectives on resource use, as well as for their internal consistency. As a result of the analysis, we highlight inconsistencies and discuss ways to improve links between perspectives and modelling concepts. To achieve this, the new framework can be used for the development or improvement of LCIA methods on resource use.

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