Euromines Brochure

Euromines brochure is a brief overview of the importance of mineral raw materials for the EU future development. Raw materials are the key enablers of many important policies that will shape our future, such as adaptation to and mitigation of the climate change challenges.

The EU has the potential to increase its capacity to source mineral raw materials domestically and sustainably. It is not a lack of resources; it is a lack of exploration with latest technology that feeds the myth of depleting resources. By increasing mineral domestic production, Europe becomes less dependent and improves its sustainable supply chain.

Mineral Raw Materials in modern society are the lifeblood of the economy. They are the basis for many sectors like agriculture, construction, IT, electronics, energy, chemistry, manufacturing, medicine. Raw materials depending industries in the EU provided 206 billion EUR of added value.

The economic importance of the raw materials sector goes far beyond the sector’s own economic activities.
Whilst engaging about 350.000 jobs within the EU, there are more than 24.6 million jobs in downstream
manufacturing industries depend on the secure supply of mineral raw materials.

The European Mineral Raw Materials Enabling SDGs

The European mineral raw materials industry contributes to sustainable development by integrating economic growth with environmental protection, social progress and effective governance. The UN laid out a sustainable development agenda to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all with 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Euromines supports these goals and is committing to working toward their fulfillment. Have a look and explore how the European mineral raw materials industry enabling the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

How to better account for your primary raw materials in your LCA

The issues of resource availability and sustainability go hand in hand as major concerns for the future of raw materials in Europe. SUPRIM aims to identify a consistent, empirically verifiable cause-and-effect chain linking flows of natural resources to sustainability impacts.

The general equations for characterisation Life Cycle Impact Assessment models developed by SUPRIM represent a new state-of-art and are the most reliable of their kind thanks to the unique mix of expertise existing within the project consortium. Read more in the SUPRIM final product publication.

Euromines Position with regards to the Technical Report on EU Taxonomy published by TEG in June 2019

As the recognized representative of the European metals and minerals mining industry covering more than 42 different metals and minerals and employing 350.000 directly and about four times as many indirectly, Euromines welcomes the Commission's Sustainable Finance Action Plan for a low carbon, greener economy and agrees that such a socio - economically efficient, sustainable and flexible financial system will contribute to long-term value creation. 

In order to successfully contribute to the common objectives, it is essential that these initiatives on sustainable finance are followed by subsequent proportionate, accurate and fit for purpose documents which include measures and recommendations appropriate to all affected stakeholders.

In light of the above, Euromines would like to make a series of comments regarding the Technical Report on EU Taxonomy published by the Technical Expert Group on Sustainable Finance on 18th of June 2019. The report is accompanied by a call for feedback as part of the ongoing work carried out by the Commission’s Directorate-general for financial stability, financial services and capital markets union, Directorate-general for environment, public consultation to which Euromines intends to participate and submit its input.

The Swedish mining sector in sustainable futures

This report presents the results from a collaborative project run by Svemin, the of mines, mineral and metal producers, and SEI. The project examined the interactions between the mining sector and wider society and how
these could play out in a sustainable transformation.

SUPRIM Newsletter - May 2019

Sustainable management of primary raw materials is now more than ever on the European agenda, 
thanks to concerns about responsible resourcing of the metals and minerals we need and an increasing awareness of potential impacts related to mining operations.

SUPRIM Newsletter is now available. Learn more about the latest development and first results of the SUPRIM project.

Providing Metals and Minerals for Carbon Neutrality

In past years the extractive industry has radically progressed in productivity and energy efficiency and is still implementing new solutions aiming at further reducing the energy consumption/unit and improving carbon-intensive operations. As the world shifts to a low-carbon future, mining companies explore methods of decarbonisation in order to efficiently and effectively fulfil the continued increasing demand for resources.

This document aims to contribute to the international and European collaborative effort among all stakeholders, and to be a source of inspiration for international and national policy makers to support decisions and regulations concerning the sustainable transition of the extractive industry. The objective of the publication is to demonstrate the technology solutions that the extractive industry implements to reduce greenhouse gas footprint.

Energy Prices and Costs in Europe (2018 Report)

A. Energy Prices and Costs in Europe (European Commission)

Published every two years, this most recent report underlines the EU's exposure to volatile and growing fossil fuel prices and notes that wholesale prices have started to rise again. Future electricity production costs are expected to increase for fossil fuel-generated electricity (due to import prices and the carbon price) and fall for renewables (linked to the decreasing costs of investment as technologies evolve), with the report suggesting that that electricity market prices could reduce the need for subsidising renewable energy technologies by 2030. 

The EU remains heavily dependent on imports of oil and gas, and the increase in fossil fuel prices (especially crude oil) made the cost of EU energy imports in 2017 rise by 26% to EUR 266 billion. The increase in oil prices could have had a negative impact on EU growth (-0.4% GDP in 2017) and on inflation (+0.6%), the report estimates.

Energy costs for businesses fell from 2008 to 2015 in most of the sectors studied, with the most significant declines appearing in some energy intensive sectors.

The report also considers fossil fuel subsidies (which did not decrease in recent years) in a context of rising energy subsidies to finance the energy transition (€170 billion in 2016). Finally, it contains chapters on the impact of price regulation and the potential benefits of dynamic pricing.

 

B. Study: Composition and Drivers of Energy Prices and Costs: Case Studies in Selected Energy Intensive Industries – 2018 (Ecofys).

Based on data collected from 189 plants over a 10-year period (2008-2017), the study shows energy prices and costs borne by EU producers operating in 11 energy intensive subsectors: bricks and roof tiles, wall and floor tiles, glass tableware, packaging glass, aluminium primary, aluminium secondary, aluminium downstream, steel (electric arc furnace - EAF), steel (basic oxygen furnace - BOF), nitrogen fertilisers and refineries. Prices for both electricity and natural gas reached a peak between 2011 and 2013 and then decreased. By 2017, recorded prices had returned to pre-crisis levels. Across all sectors, larger consumers are experiencing lower prices and costs. Regulatory components (e.g. network costs, non-recoverable taxes and levies, etc.) have a larger impact on electricity prices than on natural gas prices. Energy costs represent a driver for cost competitiveness, as they account for between 2% and 43% of total production costs in different subsectors. Whereas it is not possible to draw conclusions on the impact of energy costs on margins, a statistically significant negative association between natural gas prices and plant profitability was detected. Finally, the energy costs borne by EU producers appear to be higher than those faced by their international competitors based in Algeria, Egypt, Russia, United Arab Emirates and the US and comparable to those faced by producers in China and Turkey.

Before it’s yours we mine it: Industry 4.0

Virtually every single thing society consumes ultimately derives from a mine somewhere on earth. Without these raw materials, European citizens would be forced into lives that resemble our ancient ancestors more than the modern world. And not only do metals and minerals permeate our daily lives, they provide the material base for many other European business and industrial sectors, including both basic service and high-tech sectors.

Our first book, Before it's yours, we mine it, informed readers about raw materials and the mining sector, highlighting their critical roles in our daily lives. Now, Before it’s yours we mine it: Industry 4.0 delves deeper into these roles, exploring the role of raw materials in our daily lives as well as how mining has shaped European history and present society, with a special emphasis on how Industry 4.0 is revolutionizing the mining world. 

If you wish to order a hard copy of the book please contact:

Ms. Azi Bairami
secretariat@euromines.be

Price per book: €29

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