National minerals policies that ensure security of supply of important raw materials and ensure the sustainability of the extractive operations as well as their products are crucial to economic policies.

Therefore it is important that each country has such a policy and ensures that it includes considerations and objectives of other relevant policies, such industrial and trade, environment energy and climate change policies, health and safety and consumer protection policies, as well as regional development and employment policies.  However, it is also important that raw material policies are not jeopardised by uncoordinated policy making in the afore-mentioned areas. 

And whilst it is important to update and modernise  raw materials policies and adapt them to developments of the country it should be noted that raw material investments are long-term investments and therefore are sensitive to frequent, quick and unpredicted  changes.

The four most important elements:

I.    State strength
A state which is legitimate and capable at all levels (national, regional, and local). 
A government whose policy decisions are credible and broadly accepted and an administrative apparatus that can implement these.

II.    Limits to state strength 
Institutional checks and balances that support the legitimacy of government and the administrative apparatus, and guard against abuse of state power at all levels (national, regional, local).

III.    Compatibility of formal and informal rights, institutions and rules
Legitimacy of formal economic institutions guarding essential necessities of a stable economy (exchange rate, fiscal sustainability).

IV.    Technical capacity of the public sector and decision makers at all levels

Sustainable community development programs are those that contribute to the community’s longterm development needs and priorities and ensure a fairer distribution of the costs, benefits, risks and responsibilities associated with mining activities. 

Investment is a leading source of economic growth, job creation, infrastructure, competition, international trade and innovation. Countries with a high level of investment systematically achieve higher levels of development in more sustainable ways. A central question among policy makers is therefore how to enhance investment? Bearing in mind that investment is triggered and influenced  by multitude of factors, and that international investment agreements (IIAs) are not a substitute for long-term and comprehensive improvements towards a transparent, rules-based pro-business policy environment, they do play a fundamental role by providing an additional layer of security to foreign investors and can thus be an important factor for host countries to attracting incentivize more foreign direct investments (FDI), both in quantity and quality. 

One of the most visible economic impacts of mining/quarrying operations on a community is the employment that it generates. 
Employment is generated through the creation of jobs within the mining/quarrying operation itself, for instance during the exploration, mining/quarrying and closure/rehabilitation phases. These jobs are directly related to the mining/quarrying operation. However, there are jobs created outside of the ‘gates’ of a mining/quarrying operation. These are a result of the building of roadways to reach the mine/quarry, the construction of new homes for mines/quarries and their families, and the businesses required to service the families for instance.
The objective is to calculate the total employment generated by the operation

The guidance is intended to promote the continued development of sound scientific approaches for the classification of O&Cs and will assist the industry in achieving a harmonised approach to classification and labelling.

The first few chapters of Euromines Annual Report 2011 highlight the “services” we provide to the society. Once again we are trying to promote the fact that minerals and metals represent the basis for our lives and any industrial production processes.

The following chapters cover the latest development in the competitiveness and resource efficiency issues. As each year you will find there an update on the environmental and health & safety legislation as well as Euromines activities related to these issues. The last two parts focus on communication and outlook.

The concentration of NOx and CO gases arises predominately from the use of explosives and from vehicles and mobile machines equipped with diesel engines. During the last few decades, a significant amount of research and improvements have been made concerning effective diesel engine operation. 

You can read all about these developments in this new brochure from Euromines. 

Euromines Health and Safety Publication

A top priority for the European extractive industry is keeping workers as safe as possible. To do that, companies must make health and safety more than just a priority – it must be deeply embedded in the culture of an organisation. 

In this brochure, we address this difference and explain what companies can do to ensure the highest possible standards at every level of their organisations. This includes how policies are developed and communicated, the role of leadership and how new technologies are saving lives and reducing injuries. 

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