The Circular Economy should yield optimum solutions to the trade-offs that exist between different environmental objectives and the environmental, social and economic imperatives of Sustainable Development. The result should be an economy that optimises its use of resources and, therefore, results in improved living conditions and reduced waste globally. The European extractive industries fully support the premise that life cycle management approaches are required to describe and monitor Resource Efficiency.

See also the European Raw Materials Scoreboard

Euromines is pleased to announce the publication of the Brochure on “Sustainable Gold Mining”.

This publication aims at presenting detailed information regarding gold, its numerous uses as well as the standards applying to gold mining production in Europe. It presents concrete examples of modern-day gold mining operations and their contribution to EU’s sustainable growth.

Euromines is pleased to announce the publication of the Brochure on “Sustainable Gold Mining”.
This publication aims at presenting detailed information regarding gold, its numerous uses as well as the standards applying to gold mining production in Europe. It presents concrete examples of modern-day gold mining operations and their contribution to EU’s sustainable growth.

The mining industry welcomes the issuing of the EU’s recent Circular Economy package, which proposes a long-term framework for actions in many EU policy areas, including climate change, energy, transport, industry, raw materials, agriculture, biodiversity and regional development. The European mining industry is keen to inform its implementation by assisting EU decision-makers in understanding global minerals markets and investment decisions. Our aim is to contribute to stakeholders' understanding of the real Circular Economy; linking to the information provided so far by the European Commission, academia, think-tanks, trade associations and mining companies.

The attached document outlines the views of Euromines members and some expectations as to what the Circular Economy package should deliver for the EU.

The European extractive sector works as a community. Not only do individual mines contribute to their local communities, the sector supplies needed materials for the whole of the European economy and operates within the evolving European Community with its changing sets of guidelines and regulations. As a key component in Europe's present and future development, the mining sector has a lot to contribute. Euromines, as the representative of the extractive sector in Europe, ensures that the sector has an active voice within the European community.

Euromines publication "Natura 2000: A Guide to the Guide" is now available in Spanish!

The purpose of the European Commission Guidance on Non-energy mineral extraction and Natura 2000 is to address issues for which the European Commission is responsible. However, the extractive industry has its own guidelines on how to prevent the loss of biodiversity in all areas of operation, some of which go beyond, but do not specifically address, particular requirements of the EU Nature Directives.

This “Guide to the Guide” constitutes part of a Biodiversity Toolkit promoted by Euromines, which is otherwise made up of previously existing documents. It is intended to assist companies in their interpretation of the European Commission Guidance and discussion with permitting authorities and should be read in conjunction with the European Commission Guidance.

Click here for more information about the English issue of "Natura 2000: A Guide to the Guide".

The purpose of the European Commission Guidance on Non-energy mineral extraction and Natura 2000 is to address issues for which the European Commission is responsible. However, the extractive industry has its own guidelines on how to prevent the loss of biodiversity in all areas of operation, some of which go beyond, but do not specifically address, particular requirements of the EU Nature Directives.

This “Guide to the Guide” constitutes part of a Biodiversity Toolkit promoted by Euromines, which is otherwise made up of previously existing documents. It is intended to assist companies in their interpretation of the European Commission Guidance and discussion with permitting authorities and should be read in conjunction with the European Commission Guidance. The Toolkit addresses a broader range of issues concerning extractive industry impacts on biodiversity as follows:

Issue to be addressed Industry Tool
environmental impact assessment
compliance
European Commission Guidance
This “Guide to the Guide”
conservation beyond legal requirements
stakeholder consultation
ICMM Good Practice Guidance
monitoring and assurance
codes of conduct

Good Practices for the Collection of Biodiversity Baseline Data

E.g., Guideline to Promotion of Biodiversity at the Mineral Extraction Sites of HeidelbergCement
GRI Mining and Metals Sector Supplement
ICMM Sustainable Development Framework

Small and Medium Enterprise practices Swedish Association of Mines, Mineral and Metal Producers’ Guidelines for Exploration Work

Since 2003 Euromines’ Guidelines on Sustainable Development for the European Extractive Sector have included the commitment to “Promote the conservation of biodiversity and integrated approaches to land use planning”¹ . Euromines is also an associate member of the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and has contributed directly to the development of the ICMM Good Practice Guidance for Mining and Biodiversity (2006). In 2009, Euromines also produced a book of 101 examples of beneficial mine closure in partnership with the Post-Mining Alliance².

In return, Euromines is actively seeking greater clarity, transparency, consistency and rigour in the processes by which areas of land are managed as part of the Natura 2000 network. The Europe 2020 Strategy, the EU Raw Materials Initiative³ (RMI) and the European Commission Guidance should be used to underline the need to promote increased investment in the EU’s existing natural assets.

In many Member States the process of designating Natura 2000 sites took place in a hurried way, in the absence of any consideration of other land-uses and with more focus on quantity than quality. Therefore, factual demonstration of the biodiversity value of Natura 2000 sites will often be missing and this causes problems related to land-access, mineral planning and environmental assessment in the extractive sector.

Unfortunately, European Commission guidance documents do not necessarily create the legal certainty that extractive companies need to justify expensive exploration projects, baseline studies and impact assessments. It may therefore prove necessary at a later date to integrate elements of the European Commission Guidance into national or provincial legislation.

¹ Access the Sustainable Development Guidelines

² https://www.edenproject.com/shop/101-Things-To-Do-With-A-Hole-In-The-Ground-8229.aspx

³ http://www.euromines.org/what-we-do/raw-materials-initiative

The guidance is intended to promote the continued development of sound scientific approaches for the classification of O&Cs and will assist the industry in achieving a harmonised approach to classification and labelling.

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