Annual Report 2012

Euromines Annual Report 2012 "At the Heart of European Innovation" is now available. Each section of the Annual Report starts by an interview with the chairperson of one of the Euromines Committees focusing on innovation in the respective field. European Innovation Partnership is the main theme.

"We are the recognized point of reference for the mining industry in Europe." said in one of the interviews Euromines President Mr. Mark Rachovides. "Active participation in the most important issues and fora in Europe today demonstrates the depth and breath of our contribution in such a challenging time. From chairing the EPT SMR, to dealing with specifics such as the attempt to ban the use of cyanide in mining, we continue to make our voice heard".

The following chapters cover the latest development and Euromines activities in the field of policy, communication, environmental, ETS/Energy, H&S and of course Research and Technical Development issues.

New Euromines Profile Brochure

The European extractive sector works as a community. Not only do individual mines contribute to their local communities, the sector supplies needed materials for the whole of the European economy and operates within the evolving European Community with its changing sets of guidelines and regulations. As a key component in Europe's present and future development, the mining sector has a lot to contribute. Euromines, as the representative of the extractive sector in Europe, ensures that the sector has an active voice within the European community.

EU-Resource Efficiency Flagship - Euromines Position

Resource-Efficiency is the new Environmental Policy

  • A central environmental, economic and security issue in a multi-polar world
  • A policy concept that should yield optimum solutions to the many trade-offs that exist between the environmental, social and economic imperatives of Sustainable Development

Streamlining European biodiversity indicators 2020

This report marks the end of the current SEBI cycle noting SEBI milestones and drawing lessons for further improving the process and the indicator set.

IFC PF6: Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Management of Living Natural Resource

IFC’s Sustainability Framework articulates the Corporation’s strategic commitment to sustainable development,  and  is an integral part of  IFC’s  approach to risk management.  The Sustainability Framework comprises  IFC’s  Policy and Performance Standards on Environmental and Social Sustainability,  and IFC’s  Access to Information Policy.  The Policy on Environmental and Social Sustainability describes IFC’s commitments, roles, and responsibilities related to environmental and social sustainability. IFC’s Access to Information Policy reflects IFC’s commitment to transparency and good governance  on  its operations,  and outlines the Corporation’s institutional disclosure obligations regarding its investment and advisory services. The Performance Standards are directed towards clients, providing guidance on how to identify risks and impacts, and are designed to help avoid, mitigate, and manage risks and impacts as a way of doing business in a sustainable way, including stakeholder engagement and disclosure obligations of the client in relation to project-level activities. In the case of its direct investments (including project and corporate finance provided through financial intermediaries),  IFC  requires  its  clients to apply the Performance Standards to manage environmental and social  risks and impacts  so that development opportunities  are enhanced. IFC uses the Sustainability Framework along with other strategies, policies, and initiatives to direct the business activities of the Corporation in order to achieve its overall development objectives. The Performance Standards may also be applied by other financial institutions. 

Guidance Document: Non-energy mineral extraction and Natura 2000

Natura 2000 is the centrepiece of EU nature and biodiversity policy. It is an EU-wide ecological network of nearly 26000 sites in the 27 EU countries, established under the 1992 Habitats Directive and covering almost 18% of the EU’s land area. The aim of the network is to assure the long-term survival of Europe's most valuable and threatened species, habitats and ecosystems, which, in addition to their intrinsic values, offer a wide range of social and economic benefits to society.

These guidelines show how the needs of extractive industry can be met while avoiding adverse effects on wildlife and nature. They examine how the potential impacts of extraction activities on nature and biodiversity can be minimised or avoided altogether. They highlight the importance of strategic planning, the appropriate assessment of new developments, and the need for adequate mitigation measures. The guidelines contain many examples of best practice, and show how some extraction projects can ultimately be beneficial to biodiversity by providing highly quality ecological niches.

Views on Indicators of Resource Efficiency & Circular Economy

The Circular Economy should yield optimum solutions to the trade-offs that exist between different environmental objectives and the environmental, social and economic imperatives of Sustainable Development. The result should be an economy that optimises its use of resources and, therefore, results in improved living conditions and reduced waste globally. The European extractive industries fully support the premise that life cycle management approaches are required to describe and monitor Resource Efficiency.

See also the European Raw Materials Scoreboard

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